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Child Custody Archives

Tips to creating an effective parenting plan

When Connecticut parents get divorced, both they and their children face a period of adjustment. The full ramifications of this should be taken into consideration when creating a parenting plan. Parents should consider that children have never had to live in separate households before. Therefore, it is important to be sensitive to the emotional as well as the logistical hurdles that they may encounter when creating a custody or visitation arrangement.

How children benefit from joint custody

Parents in Connecticut who are getting divorced will need to consider how child custody will be handled. In the past, it was thought that children did better under the care of their mothers. Experts warned that children who spent overnight time with their fathers during their younger years could experience behavior and other challenges.

How to parent in high-conflict situations after divorce

In general, divorced parents in Connecticut can choose between two child-raising structures -- parallel parenting and co-parenting. The former is the better option for parents in a high-conflict divorce. Research indicates that it is the conflict and not the divorce itself that is most difficult for children to deal with. The aim of parallel parenting is to reduce that conflict even when the parents do not get along. Parallel parents generally agree on major issues, such as religion and education, but they might have little direct communication.

Child custody and visitation battle reaches Supreme Court

The state of Connecticut has laws providing grandparents with the opportunity to apply for a special relief to see their grandchildren. A special sort of custody and visitation, called grandparents' rights, provides a legal avenue for grandparents wishing to establish the legal right to be an active part of their grandchildren's lives. Recently, one family finds themselves battling before the Supreme Court over the issue.

Local author brings stress of child custody dispute into words

Connecticut residents are among the many Americans that enjoy a good book, especially if the read pertains to their personal life in some way. Whether a book is fiction or nonfiction, it can often be helpful for readers to feel as if the author truly understands their specific set of circumstances. Recently, one local author penned a novel to explain the stress and pain that can result from a child custody dispute.

Mothers fear mental health treatment may affect child custody

Connecticut residents are likely aware that taking care of mental health issues is just as important as caring for one's physical health. Health care providers are now aware that issues like anxiety and depression can affect an entire family, not just the person suffering from illness. A recent study shows that mothers are sometimes afraid to admit they may need mental health treatment because they fear it will affect child custody.

Sudden changes in child custody can cause separation anxiety

Most Connecticut parents would likely agree that even if two parents maintain separate households and are no longer a couple, both parties still want what's best for their children. Often, child custody can be a point of contention between two parents, especially if a new custody arrangement needs to be made in the aftermath of an end to a relationship, such as a divorce. It is common for both parents to have trouble learning to adjust to a new shared schedule, and issues like physical custody, child support and visitation must be addressed.

Child custody is guided by presumption in favor of joint custody

The trend in child custody law, including in Connecticut, is toward favoring joint custody. In this state's child custody law, joint custody is divided into two sections, joint legal custody and joint physical custody. Legal custody refers to the decision-making that the parents make regarding the education, health and welfare of the children, whereas physical custody refers to the amount of time each parent has with physical possession of the children.

How to create a parenting schedule that works for both of you

When you and your former spouse share children, deciding how to share custody is one of the more complicated issues of a divorce. However, even if your divorce was contentious, this does not have to be painful process. You can work with your ex to create a parenting plan that protects your children and fits both of your lifestyles.

Unconventional child custody arrangements may be the new norm

When a marriage dissolves, the life that once was thought to be forever is often broken apart and divided between the two spouses. Material possessions are often easy, but when children are involved, the process can be emotional and time consuming, and it may even escalate into an all-out child custody war. Many Connecticut parents who are going through a divorce are now opting to find new and creative ways to manage co-parenting that helps to make life more stable for the kids.

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Law Office of Robert A. Skovgaard
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